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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
this is a summary of what i did this winter. it's not really a how-to, and i'm not going to produce any of these parts for sale. this was a bike for me, not something that i want to do again for other people.


it's not a simple task to do a good job of this swap, the chimera kit is simple, but has way too many shortcomings (ie it depends on the shitty grom frame for one, we won't get into it much more than that, it has its place, but not on my bike)



i'll just let the pictures do the talking from here, maybe a blurb or two after each one.



it starts with my grom, stock engine, akrapovic full exhaust, a couple other odds and ends but pretty standard. i didn't even take a pic before i started stripping it

01 by William Glancy, on Flickr



it only took about 45 mins to get from full bike to this

02 by William Glancy, on Flickr


wow is that a spindly little frame. no good, no good at all

03 by William Glancy, on Flickr



the length of unsupported tube is probably why the bike is so shitty and wallowy once you get moving on it.

04 by William Glancy, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
it starts with a really rough mockup. just grab some tube and see where you can anchor it, and what you need for basic geometry to clear everything

05 by William Glancy, on Flickr

06 by William Glancy, on Flickr


i've seen a lot of people weld their twin spar setup onto the stock bracing for the frame spar. why on earth you'd anchor an entire frame to sheet metal is beyond me. i decided i'd grind all the material off the headset and weld my twin spar right to the steering tube (while retaining my vin plate). simple enough.

07 by William Glancy, on Flickr


twin spar welded solid, cut the main tube, didn't move a bit. geometry maintained, perfect.

08 by William Glancy, on Flickr


my welder friend did the frame fabrication. i'm an electrician, not a welder. he was gracious enough to offer to help throughout the project, and his work speaks for itself.

09 by William Glancy, on Flickr

10 by William Glancy, on Flickr




quick bodywork test. looking good

11 by William Glancy, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
with the basic twin spar done, it's time to do some fitting


12 by William Glancy, on Flickr


i turned some spacers off in the lathe to fill in the void in the frame in preparation for the brackets. (i can run my machinist friend's CNC lathe well enough to produce parts like this, a machinist i am not)


13 by William Glancy, on Flickr



with the geometry for the brackets decided on, it's off to fusion360 to design the frame brackets. i came up with this and then my friend (machinist/shop owner, not the welder, there are two friends) milled them up for me

14 by William Glancy, on Flickr


15 by William Glancy, on Flickr


decided against trying to mod the tank, fuck that. the solution for the throttle body relocation comes later.

16 by William Glancy, on Flickr

17 by William Glancy, on Flickr


18 by William Glancy, on Flickr

19 by William Glancy, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
first assembly with the completed frame, i didn't take any pics of the harness build. i'm an electrician so i just take that part for granted i guess. the donor bike had ABS so the harness was gutted completely, all unnecessary stuff stripped out, converted to coil over plug, added a quick shifter, relocated everything where it needed to go, wired up my custom controls and key bypass (with the key left on i have a push button ignition, the key overrides it if i need to lock down the bike). it's all very time consuming and boring, so i took no pictures.


27 by William Glancy, on Flickr



frame spraybombed black (for now, any modifications that may present themselves are simpler with paint. once it's set in stone good i'll powdercoat it. likely next winter)

28 by William Glancy, on Flickr


titanium header to fit onto the akrapovic slip on. built by the frame guy using a gsxr1000 header he had lying around. recycling!

29 by William Glancy, on Flickr


pretty well there

30 by William Glancy, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
and now for the solution to the TB relocation. i designed a throttle body coupler that will retain the fuel injector in the stock location, while allowing me to move the TB to make room for the tank. with this setup there's no need for any fuel controller, the bike is 100% stock for fueling and electronics. runs beautifully.

31 by William Glancy, on Flickr


we printed a prototype in ABS so i could mock it up and test it

32 by William Glancy, on Flickr



once i was sure the application was suitable, i had it printed in steel by shapeways (steel was the cheapest option in metal, didn't want to print in plastic due to fuel and structural requirements)

33 by William Glancy, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
and now for some naked pics. the goal here was to build a proper bike. no bullshit, no shortcuts, no shitty wiring jobs or poorly mounted engines, no compromises, focus on rideability, reliability, and fun. it should tick all those boxes.


you can see i side mounted an ohlins damper (a safety feature i won't go without, who knows what this thing will do if you upset it at 90mph)

there's also a KLS quickshifter for shits and giggles. you'll also see the UHMW chain slider i built. it wasn't overly necessary, it exists ONLY to lift the chain over the kickstand mount when the rear shock is fully extended and the chain is tight on the bottom. again, no compromises. during normal operation the chain is flung over it by the front sprocket, and under mild braking loads the chain clears no problem, however if you're rolling the bike around in the garage the chain would touch the frame, and if you completely unloaded the rear of the bike (heavy braking) it would touch as well. unacceptable.

34 by William Glancy, on Flickr

kept everything nice and tidy, even when the plastics are off

35 by William Glancy, on Flickr

the steering damper. clearance is very tough here so there are a few visible attempts before i got it perfect. i don't mind having the bracket bolted up like this, though i originally intended for the damper mount to be welded to the frame in a single piece.

36 by William Glancy, on Flickr


all the wiring in the rear of the bike. lots done here using oem style connectors, managed to keep the fusebox in about the same place. you can see the KLS shifter box here as well. shorai battery

37 by William Glancy, on Flickr

motion pro expansion tank. sato rearsets.

38 by William Glancy, on Flickr



how the throttle body adapter with fuel injector worked out

39 by William Glancy, on Flickr

40 by William Glancy, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
anodized the radiator

41 by William Glancy, on Flickr


42 by William Glancy, on Flickr

bigger stoppers. why not.

43 by William Glancy, on Flickr



the rear is actually a 220mm rotor. i used a chimera dual bracket and removed the second caliper provision. i did this in preparation of eventually fitting braketech axis iron rotors. they only make fronts but i'll want a set, so 220 front and back it is.

44 by William Glancy, on Flickr



closeup of the ti header, tidy work

45 by William Glancy, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
brembo billet 16x16 to match the p4 30x34 front caliper. sitting beside the switch gear i created (the switch gear i built originally for my rc51, but had extra stuff so i built a set for the grom

46 by William Glancy, on Flickr


cbr 600rr clutch perch with asv lever. custom switch gear again

47 by William Glancy, on Flickr


ignition button is on the front, red is kill switch, white is garage door opener, green is start

48 by William Glancy, on Flickr


left signal is on the front of the switch, blue is high beam, grey is horn, black is right turn signal

49 by William Glancy, on Flickr



more detail of frame bracing and tank mounting

50 by William Glancy, on Flickr

51 by William Glancy, on Flickr




proper exhaust mounting, ohlins shock, mnnthbx swingarm bushings

52 by William Glancy, on Flickr




it's a tight fit

53 by William Glancy, on Flickr




starter relay tucks away nicely behind a frame brace

54 by William Glancy, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
i'll let the assembled pics speak for themselves. after taking all of these i realized i forgot to install the oem hugger. but don't worry it's on there.

when it's all said and done, this bike retains the exact geometry of the original grom. the only difference is it now weights 250lbs (ready to ride, full to the brim) and has a bunch more horsepower, a 6 speed, and water cooling. i feel i have compromised very little in creating this bike, and considering how well it handles and rides, i'm very happy with it. it's only 21 lbs heavier than a stock grom. pretty good.






55 by William Glancy, on Flickr


56 by William Glancy, on Flickr

57 by William Glancy, on Flickr

58 by William Glancy, on Flickr

59 by William Glancy, on Flickr

60 by William Glancy, on Flickr
 

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Wibbly,

Fantastic work and thank you for sharing all of the picturesof your build - that conversion looks great!!!

I can’t wait for Tooter to post up his response on how well his Grom runs with the Yuminashi ECU and his modified ****** intake followed bya horde of pictures of his Grom with the custom rattle can exhaust....
 

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man you're making my blood pressure rise.

We can only hope he stays the hell out of this thread. there's nothing for him here.





Sorry about that Wibbly, not trying to get your blood pressure up but I could not resist -


You have a great deal of valuable knowledge that you havealways brought to the forum and shared freely, unfortunately there are some that are too obtuse to realize the knowledge youbring to them.


I have learned a lot from you and you have earned my respect.







 

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Wow. The right way to do a 300... hats off to you sir.

I really liked how you did the engine mounts, how the radiator fits, the recycled header, and generally how well everything is thought out. Very nice job, your work paid off. The chimera kits look so thrown together in comparison.

Your friend did a great job with the welding as well. I could see why you wouldn't want to make the parts, too much fabrication involved to make it all possible, too much hassle for a small if not nonexistent profit margin. It was a good read though, thank you for sharing.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G935A using Tapatalk
 

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That is certainly the way to do it. Unfortunately in my country the moment I crack the paint on the frame with the angle grinder it becomes unroadworthy and will cause the spontaneous deaths of millions of small kittens ... and probably children. So I'll just have to admire your build and go, "I wish".

One question though. Why did you make the perimeter from multiple pieces?
 

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Niiiice

My favourite part is keeping the stock grips!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
That is certainly the way to do it. Unfortunately in my country the moment I crack the paint on the frame with the angle grinder it becomes unroadworthy and will cause the spontaneous deaths of millions of small kittens ... and probably children. So I'll just have to admire your build and go, "I wish".

One question though. Why did you make the perimeter from multiple pieces?
Chromoly doesn't bend very nicely and we didn't have a bender that would do the radius we needed. The curved portions you see were leftovers from another project that my welder was working on at his shop. To try to bend it all in one piece would have been frustrating. He made the call, I'm fine with it.
 
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