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Discussion Starter #1
So I already had my Yoshimura RS-2 fitted, finally got around to installing the cam, ECU, and intake this weekend. Cam was relatively simple, hardest part of the whole thing was the valve adjustment. Just getting the valves in spec (.003 intake/.004 exhaust) multiple times to have them tighten up as I tighten the lock nut down. I suspect I may have been over tightening them in hindsight, but I figured the last thing I would want is for one of those to come loose and for the valve clearance to go haywire. In the future I will probably put less torque on it when I tighten the lock nut down. Finally got them right, and on startup I have no ticking or anything. I can say without a doubt that a Chimera intake makes your bike SUBSTANTIALLY louder. Probably just as much the removal of the air box that would act as a noise dampener as the intake itself, but I already had the exhaust fitted, so with the intake the only change that would affect the sound of the bike, Jesus is this thing loud now. I even put the db reducer back in the pipe, which helped a little bit, but most of the noise is definitely coming from the intake area. So that should add a data point to consider for the debate I’ve seen on here about if intakes actually make our bikes louder or not. It’s “I can’t ride without ear pro under my Bell Star helmet” loud now.

Otherwise, no complaints, would do it again in a heartbeat. All told I think i took about 6 hours to remove and refit the bodywork, remove the airbox, install the intake, swap the cam, adjust the valves, and install the ECU. Didn’t bother with the ECU reset since CJR said it’s not required. Like most have already said with the TB cam, it has less power/grunt than stock below 5K, but then it takes off in a rush (by comparison, it’s still a Grom) above 7K. Haven’t done top speed tests, but I don’t really care for those kinda of things anyways. The bike is for sure dramatically faster above 5K RPMs.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Congrats on the new found speed. If you don't already have one, consider a 14T sprocket. Cheap and makes a world of difference, especially up hills.
Yep already had that installed. I have a +1 rear sprocket and a new chain to install at some point too, I’m just waiting for my YSS shock to show up to do everything to the back end at once. Have the MNNTHBX bushings to install as well. 100% of my riding here in Okinawa is a 60 kph speed limit at most, so you can get away with 70-75 kph, but that’s still not even 50 mph. so I figured another tooth on the rear sprocket will be welcome and won’t make any difference for high speeds for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
FINALLY got around to getting some parts installed this weekend. MNNTHBX swingarm bushings, YSS shock, and a new +1 aluminum rear sprocket. Using the MNNTHBX tool for the stock bushing removal was a gigantic PITA, I went through 3 bolts (luckily I had two of a similar spec available in my work shop) that kept stripping under the load of trying to press the bushings out. It sucked. Was able to use a shop press to push the new bearings in though, that part was easy peasy. Was able to install the new shock only taking one side of the bodywork off, and the sprocket was obviously easy, that takes me to -1 front/+1 rear now on the stock chain. I have a new DID chain to put on too but I forgot the master link at home so I’ll go back and get to that later, I figured i was safe wheelbase-wise with the smaller sprocket in front and larger in rear. With that I didn’t mess with the preload or sag on the shock at all because I know I will be changing the wheelbase when I put the new chain on, I plan to go a bit longer, in the longer half of the chain adjuster range due to the increased hp from the cam and tune and the geometry change from the shock. I didn’t measure length, but I read the YSS shock is longer than the stock shock, and my riding position does feel slightly higher. When I put the Ohlins cartridges in some point soon hopefully I think they add a bit of fork length, and if not I may move the forks down a small and safe amount so they are just below flush at the top of the triple to get the geometry about back to stock. With the increased rear ride height the front end does feel slightly “twitchier” from the shortened trail. Night and day difference after the weekend’s mods though. The +1 rear sprocket wasn’t a massive change, but between the new bushings and new shock it doesn’t even feel like the same bike any more. Also the terrible forks are further highlighted now that the rear is better sorted.

Getting closer to being ready for track duty. Slowly.
 

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my riding position does feel slightly higher. When I put the Ohlins cartridges in some point soon hopefully I think they add a bit of fork length, and if not I may move the forks down a small and safe amount so they are just below flush at the top of the triple to get the geometry about back to stock. With the increased rear ride height the front end does feel slightly “twitchier” from the shortened trail.
Yes on this,,, makes a difference for sure...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Got the Ohlins cartridges installed today. The Hard Racing instructional video is excellent, but there are differences between the OG forks they install them in and the SF forks. Once I sorted through all the differences it took me about 4 hours total, including putting everything back together and cleanup. First time I’ve ever done this too. Went with the 6.0 N-mm springs since the Ohlins manual said for riders 80 kg and up to use those. I’m right at that weight, just a couple lbs over it, but I went with the 6.0s considering track duty use is the intent for this bike. I had new forks seals on hand but didn’t wind up installing them since the bike is only 2 yrs old and these seals seem to be fine. Hope I don’t wind up regretting that decision. I didn’t get to test ride as it was pouring rain out by the time I finished, so my thoughts on how the forks feel, plus my inspection of the forks to make sure the seals held up fine to the abuse of the installation will have to wait. They did not add any fork length, though there is an Ohlins supplied spacer that’s part of the kit that it looks like you could probably remove that and get another 15 mm or more of fork length if you wanted to. I did not do that, but I did wind up moving the forks down in the triples about 5 or 6 mm so the top of the new Ohlins caps are flush with the top triple. We’ll see how that goes. I don’t think it’s safe to run it any lower than that, but with that, and the stiffer springs keeping me higher in the stroke in general, I bet that’s plenty to keep the static and dynamic front geometry pretty solid.
 

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You said the MNNTHBX was a PITA because the bolts keep stripping. Did you grease the bolts before doing it? I had zero issues with my install but also greased thee hell out of the threads of the bolts before starting. Smooth as silk.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You said the MNNTHBX was a PITA because the bolts keep stripping. Did you grease the bolts before doing it? I had zero issues with my install but also greased thee hell out of the threads of the bolts before starting. Smooth as silk.
No I didn’t grease the first one, and it shredded promptly. I did grease the second one but maybe not enough, it lasted longer but it also stripped. The third one I greased a similar amount as the second one, but maybe it was a different steel or maybe just that I was far enough long that the third one lasted for the remainder of the job.

So yeah, grease your bolt, so to speak.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Changed the title of the thread since this is basically a build thread now.

First test ride on the all new suspension complete. Like you would have guessed, this doesn't even feel like the same bike any more. It's a different motorcycle altogether. All the things people say, it's more composed, the suspension actually damps unlike before when you come to a stop and the bike rocks back and forth. I think I like the fork height where it is, down about 5 or 6 mm from flush -- the bike would probably have felt better regardless just due to the improved suspension, but the front end feels a lot more planted and less twitchy now. Maybe the bike is slightly less "nimble" but more rake/trail for track use is not a bad thing more often than not. I'll leave it there until I get some aggressive parking lot track day kind of riding in.

I will hopefully get to installing the new chain, brake lines and pads, ProTaper bars, and Ebay adjustable footpegs this weekend, and I am not going to run the swingarm length any longer than stock. So I will be cutting my new chain to 106 links like the stock chain and will go with the stock wheelbase. My original logic to extend the swingarm length isn't holding up to my own scrutiny over time -- the 4-5 hp gain I got from the TB cam, intake, and tune isn't a world changer, it's not like I dropped a 250/300 motor in that I need more swingarm length. It's not all of a sudden a wheelie monster because it makes 12 hp. Riding it today made me think that I don't need more wheelbase to slow the steering more than suspension and fork position changes already have. Now I wish I had bought the DID chain in 106 links instead of 120 links, but I do have a chain breaker to shorten it.

All my big race bikes in the past I just paid a shop to do all the work, but I'm quite enjoying doing the work myself on this bike, just finding the time is the challenge.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Got a little bit further along. Installed DID 420 non- O-ring chain and replaced front brake line, pads, and fluid. I didn't have a rivet press anyways, so while I know the clip-type master link that came with the DID chain is not as good as it gets, it was pretty easy to change out. Did have to use my Motion Pro chain breaker tool for the first time to shorten the chain from 120 links to 106, but that was easy as well. After futzing around with the stock chain adjusters for a while and doing some measurements, I got my chain slack between 20-25 mm. As for the front brakes, I used Goodridge line and 45 degree Goodridge banjos, but learned a couple lessons after doing this for the first time. First, the top banjo bolt is not a 45 degree bend. The bottom one is, so the line routing is fine at the caliper, but it's not right at the master cylinder. I can get by with it for now, but I will have to change out the top banjo at some point. Also, these banjos did not come with new crush washers -- I think new banjo bolts would have, but not the banjos. So I reused my stock crush washers, but I will be placing an order in the next couple days for both a new banjo and for 4 new crush washers to do the job over. I cut the 3 grommets off the stock brake line and reused them, and I used Amsoil DOT 4 brake fluid. Overall, using a vacuum bleeder the job was pretty simple, but again, I will have to replace the fluid, crush washers, and top banjo in the near future. The new EBC sintered pads went in pretty easy too, and once I got out on the road today and did a couple progressive brake applications from 45-50 mph they started to bed in well as they were squeaky and wooden feeling at first. The brakes are REMARKABLY better just with new pads, a steel braided line, and new fluid. So for anyone looking to upgrade the front brakes, try that first and see if you're satisfied without going further for a new rotor and/or caliper. This is probably all I will do to the front brakes, I can't see needing more than this on a bike this small.

I'm getting really itchy to get out for some high performance riding of parking lot track day variety. Still have just a couple things to do, but the big one being I need to get my new Kenda tires mounted. Before putting the bike through its paces I also need to swap out the footpegs, and that's all I need. I have Protaper Honda Mini bars to put on as well with a short-throw throttle and new grips, but those are not absolutely a must to have done before I start "tracking" the bike. I just ordered a billet clutch plate, Sex Machine clutch springs, and a Kitaco oil pump from Hard Racing as well, but those aren't must-do's before starting to track the bike. I tried ordering a Kitaco clutch cover and oil cooler too, but the clutch covers are out of stock basically around the world, even Ebay posts that say they have them in stock are saying they don't if you actually message the sellers. Goal is to get a couple parking lot days in before hopefully the mid-June race round at the local kart track if it's not cancelled for COVID or monsoons.
 

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FINALLY got around to getting some parts installed this weekend. MNNTHBX swingarm bushings, YSS shock, and a new +1 aluminum rear sprocket. Using the MNNTHBX tool for the stock bushing removal was a gigantic PITA, I went through 3 bolts (luckily I had two of a similar spec available in my work shop) that kept stripping under the load of trying to press the bushings out. It sucked. Was able to use a shop press to push the new bearings in though, that part was easy peasy. Was able to install the new shock only taking one side of the bodywork off, and the sprocket was obviously easy, that takes me to -1 front/+1 rear now on the stock chain. I have a new DID chain to put on too but I forgot the master link at home so I’ll go back and get to that later, I figured i was safe wheelbase-wise with the smaller sprocket in front and larger in rear. With that I didn’t mess with the preload or sag on the shock at all because I know I will be changing the wheelbase when I put the new chain on, I plan to go a bit longer, in the longer half of the chain adjuster range due to the increased hp from the cam and tune and the geometry change from the shock. I didn’t measure length, but I read the YSS shock is longer than the stock shock, and my riding position does feel slightly higher. When I put the Ohlins cartridges in some point soon hopefully I think they add a bit of fork length, and if not I may move the forks down a small and safe amount so they are just below flush at the top of the triple to get the geometry about back to stock. With the increased rear ride height the front end does feel slightly “twitchier” from the shortened trail. Night and day difference after the weekend’s mods though. The +1 rear sprocket wasn’t a massive change, but between the new bushings and new shock it doesn’t even feel like the same bike any more. Also the terrible forks are further highlighted now that the rear is better sorted.

Getting closer to being ready for track duty. Slowly.
Hate to hear you had problems, I installed mine on Friday and had no trouble using the included tools/bolts. Only used 1 set of bolts, didn't need the spares they supply. I greased the threads heavily and used hand tools not impacts to install them. I did freeze the inserts prior to putting them in like they recommend. The only issue I had is when you combine the bushings with Driven rearsets the pivot bolt is too short to thread into the locking portion of the nut. My longer chimera pivot bolt should come in today.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yeah had no issues on the re-install of the bushings using the shop press, but grease the bolt for the removal of the stock bushings to save yourself a headache.

Got the Ebay adjustable footpegs fitted and a direct shift lever (I forget the brand) that removes the shifter linkage. I have to go back and loctite them after making some adjustments later though. Just dropped the wheels and new Kendas off at a local shop to get the tires mounted -- the language barrier makes it difficult to call around and find the best prices, but I'm taking it in the shorts from this shop ($60 to mount a pair of Grom tires) for that reason and the fact that I don't want to drive all over Okinawa to try to find a better deal, I don't have time for that and I'm hoping to give this bike its first "track" shakedown tomorrow at the base MSF training pad. Placed an order today from DROWSports for a number plate and a new 30" brake line to replace the 32" I just installed that is already a bit too long for my liking. I'll have to wait for the new line to show up before mounting the ProTaper Honda Mini bars since it will be WAY too long then. Clutch plate, clutch springs, and oil pump should show up some time in the next couple weeks. I'll post some pics at some point in case anyone wants to see the footpegs or whatever. I'm on the lookout for tire warmers now.
 

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SVRacingparts or Moto-D make good 12" warmers.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Tried everything out yesterday with some hard riding finally. Set up a cone course at the MSF training pad. I had to just use the gauge on my bike pump to set tire pressures because the batteries in my nice MotionPro digital gauge ruptured. So who knows what pressure I was actually running, but it was around 19 cold front and rear according to that crappy little gauge. Bike felt great, but the only thing I’m not happy with for kart track riding is the -1/+1 gearing is still too tall. It would probably be fine for a supermoto track or just a big kart track, but I only used 1st and 2nd on this course I had set up that I think is larger than the kart track here locally that hosts races a few times a year. Not sure yet if I’ll do anything to change that, I might just deal with it. Not having warmers really does suck as I haven’t done “track” riding for 4 years or so now without them, so I probably will actually buy some warmers now, I was a bit on the fence before. Didn’t mess with the rear shock preload at all as I was alone out there and couldn’t really see or measure how much static and rider sag I had. But for the riding I was doing and just getting familiar with all the changes it was fine.
 
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