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Discussion Starter #1
Heya..

so, I'm trying to figure out the best way to keep my MSX 125 protected from the salt they will put on the roads here soon, and the water/snow in general. Don't tell me to park the bike cause that's not an option :p

I bought this silicone spray which tolerates ~392ºF (200ºC), but I don't know if it's a bad idea to coat the engine with the stuff or not. A friend of mine suggested I'd clean it real good, oil it up and run trough some dusty roads to get some grime on it and leave it until spring, then steam/wash that off.

Any ideas? I think I'd preferr a product which creates a thin protective layer which can be washed off with a steamer or similar, and just live with the fact that I'd have to clean/reapply that multiple times during winter.
 

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I generally only ride in the dry - but every time I come back I clean the bike - normally a wrag or a wet wipe / if its dirty with water then dry it off - then spray the complete bike (excluding tyre and discs) with silicone spray.

It works and stops it corroding - but you need to do it frequently!
 

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I generally only ride in the dry - but every time I come back I clean the bike - normally a wrag or a wet wipe / if its dirty with water then dry it off - then spray the complete bike (excluding tyre and discs) with silicone spray.

It works and stops it corroding - but you need to do it frequently!
Thanks for the swift reply :)

My main concern about silicone spray has been if the engine temperature exceeds the temperature the spray can handle.

So basically you're saying silicone works? :) If that's the case I'll probably clean it, spray it with silicone, wipe off snow/water after using the bike and repeating the clean/silicone procedure every now and then.
 

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Thanks for the swift reply :)

My main concern about silicone spray has been if the engine temperature exceeds the temperature the spray can handle.

So basically you're saying silicone works? :) If that's the case I'll probably clean it, spray it with silicone, wipe off snow/water after using the bike and repeating the clean/silicone procedure every now and then.
Our techs here at the Yamaha dealership spray the engines of the jet skis that we service with Yamashield. If you are concerned about the silicone spray igniting, you may try that.
 

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Your best bet is probably to coat everything with Rust Check.

Motorcycle finishes are NOT meant for salt and your bike will look like snot within a year or two. I rode my TW for half a winter in the salt and I really wish I hadn't.

If I were to do it again, I'd buy a case of spray can rust check and coat the living bejesus out of everything that could possibly corrode. Then degrease everything come spring.
 
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