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Great. Wish I had mine to look over. How long did it take once you ordered it, how many pages are in it, and does it go into detail about how to service the oil spinner, replace head steering bearings, replace brake discs, replace a sprocket, for example?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It came as an auto ship from Honda for our shop. So I don't know how long it would take to order one. Will be ordering my personal one today.
And it goes into great detail on how to disassemble, repair, and service the complete bike.
 

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OK thanks. The Helm website said it was the official service manual used by Honda, so I should get the same thing. Are you a mechanic?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
OK thanks. The Helm website said it was the official service manual used by Honda, so I should get the same thing. Are you a mechanic?
It is the official manual for the bike. I just tried to order mine and my parts guy said I couldn't get it yet. Service advisor/techician.
 

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Yes def order the Helms one for any DIY people. Helms is the same that Honda dealers use.
 

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The service manual is available though at Helm's website. $39.95 plus $6 handling but if you work for Honda you probably get a discount or free.
 

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No, you do not get a free manual. The discount would simply be whatever discount your employer offers on any parts/accessories.

And yes, Honda dealerships get manuals automatically shipped to them once they are available.
 

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$45 will get me almost half an oil change on the Grom at my Honda Dealer plus I get to wait around for a couple hours, so it's a no brainer. Sounds very reasonably priced. The thing that convinced me to do my own maintenance is how easy it should be to work on the Grom and the more frequent valve checks meaning I would have to leave the bike there a day which does not work out well for me. I don't do my other maintenance though any more. I have service contracts on my other bikes. The Gixxer valves are due to be checked in at 14000 miles (I now have 9800 miles on it) so that's a once a year thing for me, plus it does not look easy to do...taking off a bunch of stuff just to get to the valves, then they are the shim type. The Zero has no maintenance other than brakes, belt, tires and brake fluid once a year and I have a LIFETIME free maintenance agreement with my Zero dealer! The Vespa. OK, I do that maintenance, but it's easy since I've had a bunch of them and know my way around it. I will enjoy working on the Grom. Tires though, I will have done at my Vespa/Zero dealer who is my neighbor...same size tires as Vespa.
 

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Yes, you need that if you plan to do any maintenance. The photos are kind of small and not crystal clear, but plenty good enough to show the parts, how many bolts to remove and their location, and detail is very good. Lots on fuel injection that I won't work on, but still all good info. Chances are very good you would never need to deal with the FI. Steering bearings are another matter. Every bike I have owned eventually needed those either tightened or replaced, some after only a couple thousand miles. So far, my Honda dealer has no access to Grom parts, even though I was able to provide the OEM part no. from another Honda Dealer someone posted, so I can't even order any parts yet...locally anyway.
 

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Since the valve tool costs $45, I decided to make my own. The top of the valve tappet adjusting screw fits a 4 mm socket, so I took a 4 mm socket and used a 6 mm hex key for the handle, wrapped it with a little masking tape and it slid right on nice and snug. The cost of that was $0 and I'm sure it will work just fine. In fact since there's a right angle bend in the hex key, it gets the hex key handle and your hand off to the side and completely out of the way for you to place the wrench to tighten the locking nut. Of course you could just use pliers to hold the set screw too while you re-tighten the lock nut, but I don't like use pliers on screws or bolts.
 
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