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Thanks for sharing this useful information. It so happens that I just performed the Ohlins upgrade kit on my 2017, but I am still learning and gaining valuable insights from threads such as this one. I also noticed how very dark the stock fork oil looked when I drained the forks -- I am not sure if quality fork oil is supposed to look like that?
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Thanks for sharing this useful information. It so happens that I just performed the Ohlins upgrade kit on my 2017, but I am still learning and gaining valuable insights from threads such as this one. I also noticed how very dark the stock fork oil looked when I drained the forks -- I am not sure if quality fork oil is supposed to look like that?
^^^^ Definitely not. Honda used crappy oil to begin with.
 

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Did this mod last week and I was very impressed! not loads of sag when sitting on the bike or pulling up at lights, no compacting down of the travel round long bumpy corners and no frights from bottoming out when hitting pot holes in the dark anymore.

I recon the £10.00 for a bottle of oil and this mod was one of the best I've ever spent... S.F riders need to try this A.S.A.P.

Big thank's for sharing and the photo's to shush319.
 

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Did this mod last week and I was very impressed! not loads of sag when sitting on the bike or pulling up at lights, no compacting down of the travel round long bumpy corners and no frights from bottoming out when hitting pot holes in the dark anymore.

I recon the £10.00 for a bottle of oil and this mod was one of the best I've ever spent... S.F riders need to try this A.S.A.P.

Big thank's for sharing and the photo's to shush319.
That's good to hear. Next on my to-do list ... (unless the winter really underlines how bad the OEM tyres are and I go for a pair of CityGrips early.)

PS Did you go with the 20wt oil?
 

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I used 20 wt, wouldn't use anything lighter, maybe even 30 wt to be honest. It feels way better but definitely still very soft in my opinion, curious how much better 30 wt would be

Sent from my SM-N920T using Tapatalk
 

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I used 15w, and after riding for a month, wish I had gone with 20w. Going to play with oil level a bit (add a little, so there is less air to compress) to see if I can make it a little bit stiffer (Giggity)........ Either way, it is still better than the pogo stick it use to be. I am use to an R6 setup for Daytona, so its suspension is very stiff to keep from bottoming out on the highbanks from the G-forces, so I like my suspension a bit more solid.
 

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That's good to hear. Next on my to-do list ... (unless the winter really underlines how bad the OEM tyres are and I go for a pair of CityGrips early.)

PS Did you go with the 20wt oil?
Yea martco I only managed to pump 200ml of the original oil into the wife's Pirex jug (steady now) and filled the same amount of 20wt back, the difference is chalk and cheese.

On a different note i was down the smoke for a 3 day visit last week and kept an eye out for your bike but no show, I only saw one grom a standard red one parked up next to Chancery lane station in that spot in the middle of Holborn road. seems ever time I'm down and on the lookout for Royal Jordanian he is on his holidays also!!
 

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Yea martco I only managed to pump 200ml of the original oil into the wife's Pirex jug (steady now) and filled the same amount of 20wt back, the difference is chalk and cheese.

On a different note i was down the smoke for a 3 day visit last week and kept an eye out for your bike but no show, I only saw one grom a standard red one parked up next to Chancery lane station in that spot in the middle of Holborn road. seems ever time I'm down and on the lookout for Royal Jordanian he is on his holidays also!!
I'm on my commute run every day from Muswell Hill to Hammersmith and back, but not much else so I've never seen RJ either! I don't see many Groms around at all, indeed the number of powered 2-wheelers overall seems to have dropped off over recent years. The bicycle is enjoying a renaissance however, sadly not accompanied by much in the way of road sense or hazard avoidance by it's riders. (What is it with women on bicycles deciding it's a good idea to undertake a truck just as it turns left??? Had to look away on more than one occasion..)

Must go and dig out the Pirex jug.
 

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I used 15w, and after riding for a month, wish I had gone with 20w. Going to play with oil level a bit (add a little, so there is less air to compress) to see if I can make it a little bit stiffer (Giggity)........ Either way, it is still better than the pogo stick it use to be. I am use to an R6 setup for Daytona, so its suspension is very stiff to keep from bottoming out on the highbanks from the G-forces, so I like my suspension a bit more solid.
I’m thinking 20w myself. Considering doing this!
 

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I guess this is still considered a decent upgrade to the stock pogosticks?

I dont track mine so cans see spending big bucks on new internals but need to do something to these mushy things.

How much oil goes in them?
 

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Same here, I'm over 200 lbs. with gear and my 2019 forks bottom out on the dip in my driveway leading to the street! These forks are so soft and mushy they're actually a little scary, I assume they are dialed in for teenagers under 150 lbs. I will try 30w and see how it goes. Can anything be done easily about the rear shock without spending $$ for a new one? Is the YSS good enough for someone who will never go to the track or push it, but wants enough support and safety for pleasure cruising around?
 

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Same here, I'm over 200 lbs. with gear and my 2019 forks bottom out on the dip in my driveway leading to the street! These forks are so soft and mushy they're actually a little scary, I assume they are dialed in for teenagers under 150 lbs. I will try 30w and see how it goes. Can anything be done easily about the rear shock without spending $$ for a new one? Is the YSS good enough for someone who will never go to the track or push it, but wants enough support and safety for pleasure cruising around?
Did you ever get around to swapping 30w.? I'm needing to try something with my 2019 pogo..
 

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Can anyone explain what this is actually doing? I have spoken with my suspension guy at length about this and neither of us can really figure this ut. What we are fairly certain is not happening is any increase in preload or suspension travel. Unless I'm missing something, all that appears to be happening is a lengthening of the damper rod.

We know that to increase preload the main springs will need to be compressed at resting. This can only be accomplished by increasing the strength of the top out spring by a large margin, or by disassembling the forks to shim the bottom of the main spring (which may not even increase preload if the top out spring is very soft), or by shortening the effective length of the inner fork tube.

This mod doesn't seem to affect dampening.

It does affect geometry by raising the front of the bike, so maybe that is where the effect comes from?

I think this specific way this is being done on the SF has other issues....mainly that the dampening rod is no longer locked into the fork cap because the rod is no longer bottomed in the cap. Because of the rubber bumper bushing between the cap and "lock nut" the effectiveness of the lock nut is greatly reduced. Maybe I'm missing something here, but this seems to be the case. The OG Grom fork mod still had a firm metal connection between the fork cap and the dampening rod, without any rubber in between the connections. With that setup, the cap is not prone to unthread from the dampening rod. At very least i think a short length of solid steel rod should be inserted into the cap threads before the rod is threaded back in so the rod can still be "bottomed" in the cap for SF mod prescribed here.

So, I'm not asking how the bike "feels different". That is fairly well documented. i'm asking WHY this works.
 

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Can anyone explain what this is actually doing? I have spoken with my suspension guy at length about this and neither of us can really figure this ut. What we are fairly certain is not happening is any increase in preload or suspension travel. Unless I'm missing something, all that appears to be happening is a lengthening of the damper rod.

We know that to increase preload the main springs will need to be compressed at resting. This can only be accomplished by increasing the strength of the top out spring by a large margin, or by disassembling the forks to shim the bottom of the main spring (which may not even increase preload if the top out spring is very soft), or by shortening the effective length of the inner fork tube.

This mod doesn't seem to affect dampening.

It does affect geometry by raising the front of the bike, so maybe that is where the effect comes from?

I think this specific way this is being done on the SF has other issues....mainly that the dampening rod is no longer locked into the fork cap because the rod is no longer bottomed in the cap. Because of the rubber bumper bushing between the cap and "lock nut" the effectiveness of the lock nut is greatly reduced. Maybe I'm missing something here, but this seems to be the case. The OG Grom fork mod still had a firm metal connection between the fork cap and the dampening rod, without any rubber in between the connections. With that setup, the cap is not prone to unthread from the dampening rod. At very least i think a short length of solid steel rod should be inserted into the cap threads before the rod is threaded back in so the rod can still be "bottomed" in the cap for SF mod prescribed here.

So, I'm not asking how the bike "feels different". That is fairly well documented. i'm asking WHY this works.

The mod extends the damper rod length. The fork bottoms out on the top cap, by extended the damper rod you push the fork lower further away from the top cap at full extension, thus increasing fork travel. (See my OG fork mod link in my signature below). With the OG forks you can easily get another inch of travel (which is huge considering stock travel is 3.9, so over 25% travel gained), which puts your sag numbers in a more proper spot with the stock spring, paired with some thicker oil actually makes the stock forks decent. The concept for this SF fork mod is the same as mine but not as much extra travel (~1/2in).
 

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The mod extends the damper rod length. The fork bottoms out on the top cap, by extended the damper rod you push the fork lower further away from the top cap at full extension, thus increasing fork travel. (See my OG fork mod link in my signature below). With the OG forks you can easily get another inch of travel (which is huge considering stock travel is 3.9, so over 25% travel gained), which puts your sag numbers in a more proper spot with the stock spring, paired with some thicker oil actually makes the stock forks decent. The concept for this SF fork mod is the same as mine but not as much extra travel (~1/2in).
Now this makes sense. No extra preload or dampening, but additional travel is being gained because the zero point is farther from the bump stop. I bet it also helps that compression dampening has the chance to kick in a bit higher in the stroke (in theory).

Have you taken apart an SF fork? If so does my theory that you are losing some structural integrity by losing the lock created by bottoming the rod in the cap make sense? Seems like a solid spacer inside the cap threads could solve that and is a necessary consideration when doing the SF mod as suggested by the OP.
 

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Copied from another thread for posterity....

[the forks end up feeling]Firmer because you are compressing the main spring more at the end of the stroke + the addition of thicker oil to make the shim stack create more dampening.

Similar in concept to preload, but in this form, its actually more proper because like stated, you increase fork travel (on the OG grom forks) by 25% which puts the stock sag with a normal 150-160lb rider in a more adequate zone (the fork sags just as much but you have another inch of travel before bottoming out).
I see. The spring is "firmer" feeling at the bottom of the stroke because we hit the bump stop and inch of travel later. The stock setup bottoms out on the bump stop way before the spring can provide that support, especially for a heavy rider. This makes way more sense.

THANK YOU for the explanation.
 

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The mod extends the damper rod length. The fork bottoms out on the top cap, by extended the damper rod you push the fork lower further away from the top cap at full extension, thus increasing fork travel. (See my OG fork mod link in my signature below). With the OG forks you can easily get another inch of travel (which is huge considering stock travel is 3.9, so over 25% travel gained), which puts your sag numbers in a more proper spot with the stock spring, paired with some thicker oil actually makes the stock forks decent. The concept for this SF fork mod is the same as mine but not as much extra travel (~1/2in).


I dont have a grom but thinking the nut can not be the bottomed out stop or the rubber bumper would do nothing.

If theres a only a counter-bore in the lower leg to except the nut width only, and the washer & rubber bumper creates the bottomed out then sounds like its the best you can do

but if the lower leg has a through hole (not counter bore) for the nut diameter, then could a common threaded female coupler along with a 3/4" long section of threaded bolt to restore it to a male thread be used to increase the damper rod length ?
 

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I dont have a grom but thinking the nut can not be the bottomed out stop or the rubber bumper would do nothing.

If theres a only a counter-bore in the lower leg to except the nut width only, and the washer & rubber bumper creates the bottomed out then sounds like its the best you can do

but if the lower leg has a through hole (not counter bore) for the nut diameter, then could a common threaded female coupler along with a 3/4" long section of threaded bolt to restore it to a male thread be used to increase the damper rod length ?

It definitely could, but i think the extension needed would be too long as you would need to unthread the damper rod completely for the spacer + some more so the standoff could neck back down to male threads.
 
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