Honda Grom banner
121 - 128 of 128 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Discussion Starter · #121 ·
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Motorcycle Light Automotive design

Watch Silver Rectangle Jewellery Font


Pic from the White SP cam upgrade. And a feeler gauge. Unfortunately, I must have been enjoying myself too much and don't have any others to share. Tinkering in the garage is one of my favorite things to get lost in.

Never took any shots of the 12oclock labs speedo healer installs either. And that was on 3 bikes. I'm slipping. 😉
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Discussion Starter · #122 · (Edited)
It's hard to believe it's been just one year now since the 1st SP acquisition last July and I'm still having as much fun riding it as I did when new
Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive lighting Motorcycle

I made it a point to stop off the other day and snap a pic of the 8000 mile milestone 😉
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Fuel tank Automotive lighting Motorcycle

No troubles to report on it. The New cam is very nice. Since installing the open Worx airbox cover the sound is really satisfying, like a little hotrod but without being one bit overbearing. To me the slip-on muffler with sound insert, OEM header pipe with the inline catalytic converter, and open air box cover combination is absolute aural nirvana.

The rear tire center tread grooves are starting to get thin, again. I changed the original IRC rear tire somewhere just after 4000 miles. I have a new spare 140 Power Pure waiting to replace the rear tire, then it's back to the 130 size which I discovered I prefer by comparison on the RacerBoy SP. I'm changing tires myself now and will upgrade the valve stem with aftermarket.

I spooned Power Pure tires on new wheels for the red Racerboy and installed new aluminum valve stems when doing so. It's nice to fill and check the air pressure with one hand. With the OEM stems I tend to use both hands, one to hold the stem and the other to check or fill because they move around and away when applying pressure. The aftermarket aluminum stems are planted solid like they're part of the wheel and it's just convenient and easier for me to check and fill with one hand.

Auto part Composite material Camera accessory Automotive wheel system Rim


The original front OEM IRC tire still looks good with plenty of meat still left after 8000 miles. Surprising! I have the extra set of gold wheels that came mounted with the OEM Vee rubbers that I took off the RacerBoy SP right after I bought it that I have yet to put a mile on. (I wanted black wheels on RacerBoy, just call it a cosmetic dalliance.) After I use up the spare rear Power Pure SC 140 I will use the gold/Vee Rubber set on this bike next so those tires are not being wasted. Then back to Power Pure 130/120 from then on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Discussion Starter · #124 · (Edited)
8,000 miles in a year. Very Impressive!
Is it though? LOL When a little bike is the easiest most convenient thing to jump on for errands, outside of joy riding - those miles really do start to add up. The 2 other 22 Groms I have are sporting over 5000 miles combined. So over 13,000 miles for the 3 22's for the first year, and I'm not going to bring up the Monkey or Trail which I haven't been exactly neglecting...

There's a lot of riding time yet for this year though.

It sure doesn't feel like a lot - but when it's something you love... I guess it shows! :love:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Discussion Starter · #125 · (Edited)
Checking in...

I took note I needed to keep an eye on the rear tire tread the other day as I noticed the center tread getting thin on the White SP. When I recently checked more closely, I discovered my tread indicators on the Power Pure SC weren't there, ...long gone in fact. When it starts to get worn, that last bit of tread really goes fast!
Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Light


So I was really wanting to take the White SP out for a run before it got dark the day before yesterday so rather than spoon the tire myself, which takes me a while, I ran the wheel up to the dealer right before closing and they swapped on a new power Pure SC 140 I brought with me in no time. And they were kind enough to swap in an aluminum valve stem I brought too. It took maybe 15 minutes and I left there quite smug as I didn't even break a sweat. :p

Got home, put the wheel back on and as I was tightening the axel nut I detected a disturbance in the force. The axel nut was giving me trouble. I noticed it was hard to take off but didn't stop to think why because I was in such a hurry to get on the road before dark. But it sure wasn't going back on the way it should, something felt wrong.

Cylinder Wood Pattern Electric blue Metal


I'm such a doofus. Too many 2 minute quick chain adjustments acting like I was the Ace in a pit crew came back to bite me in the ass. My axel threads were all boogered up, but I didn't get mad. I knew who was to blame. From now on I'll take a beat to grab the torque wrench. I've done this procedure so many countless times smiling because of the convenience of the aftermarket chain adjusters and spooled stand combination. Luckily I had another axel bolt in my spare part stock reserves. Now, finally, it's off to the races!

But before I grabbed my helmet I took a gander at my front tire tread. It's remarkable it has 8000 miles on it and plenty of tread left.

No, it didn't.

To clarify, when I actually took the time to find the tread indicators on the OEM IRC front tire I realized they weren't located in the center cut groove, which was still looking great. They were just off to the sides of it in the side sips. They were there - but indicating the jig was up. Then I noticed the tread wear on both sides of the center cut line and realized there should be more sips along it, but some had been completely worn away.

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread Synthetic rubber


Oh hell, forget the twilight ride, I'm changing that front tire right now.

That was fun. :rolleyes:

Lots of sweating and cursing, ...had to be done though, and I got an aluminum valve stem put in. With that done and my ride window for the night closed I turned my attention to the chain. Yep, of course I found inconsistencies in slack tension as I rotated the tire. Off with the rear wheel again, new sealed chain installed. Sprockets were in pretty good shape with little wear showing (I swapped OEM replacement sprockets in around 4000 miles ago at the last rear tire and chain change.) EDIT: And swapped in a new OEM sprocket pair again anyway, they're so cheap I figured might as well.

All that was the day before yesterday. Just got back in from a twilight ride and everything feels good. Really good. Sharp as a tack in fact. Switching over between quick left and right tight sweeping curves has a really good feel now. I never pontificated how nice the Ohlins suspension is and I'm not going to now other than to say... pure bliss.

Should have changed those tires sooner I guess. ...meh, Live and Learn.

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Vehicle Plant Toy


So what have I learned? OEM rear tires last me about 4000 miles. OEM chains last me about 4000 miles. After market rear tires last me about 4000 miles. After market sealed chains last me about 4000 miles. So now I know.

I do tend to ride the 22 white SP in a "spirited" fashion, some might even call harsh. Not like the lollygagging grocery runs on the Trail125, ...no.

While the front OEM tire seemed to last a lot longer than I ever expected, I'm going to remain better vigilant of those tread wear indicators from now on and see how long the new PP SC front tire lasts next time 4000 miles comes around 😉
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
236 Posts
I did this recently on 2 of mine. My SF had some race shinkos on it that wore out quick and I have an extra set of OG wheels with power pures that I swapped over, should have checked tire pressure. First ride around the block was scary at the first turn. Loved them on yesterday at the proper pressure.

I have a stunt beater OG that I bought some used SF wheels for and learned the front wheel was bent. Was out of town this week and found some wheels and tires for $200, so the bent one has been replaced. So nice to be rid of the death wobbles. I celebrated with a jump over some speed bumps. Still able to bottom the front suspension with the stiffer kitaco fork springs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
So what have I learned? OEM rear tires last me about 4000 miles. OEM chains last me about 4000 miles. After market rear tires last me about 4000 miles. After market sealed chains last me about 4000 miles. So now I know.
What determines when to replace the chain?

The chain adjuster on my '22 Monkey still has little bit of room to be moved back to tighten the chain but the worn sprocket is what is making me consider replacing the chain with the sprocket now at 3950 miles.

But if you find aftermarket chain lasting only 4000 miles as well, I wonder if I should just go with the OEM parts for another 4000 mile run.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Discussion Starter · #128 ·
What determines when to replace the chain?

The chain adjuster on my '22 Monkey still has little bit of room to be moved back to tighten the chain but the worn sprocket is what is making me consider replacing the chain with the sprocket now at 3950 miles.

But if you find aftermarket chain lasting only 4000 miles as well, I wonder if I should just go with the OEM parts for another 4000 mile run.
For me I was looking for tight and stretched spots in the chain when the rear was on a stand, and found some. When the chain slack changes as you rotate the rear wheel to check different areas of the chain then it's time for a new chain. The only advantage for me using a sealed chain is it is more forgiving on maintenance (lubing). And I may be a little more harsh on my Grom chains when alone far away on desolate back roads, sort of a Jekyll and Hyde thing. 😉

I saw your pic of the monkey sprocket and it's definitely time to replace it and that can't be good for the chain that's been on there with it for the last 4000 miles. I would replace the chain while you're addressing the sprocket and that will be one less issue you'll discover later that needs attention because it's inevitable. Of course you can remove the chain, clean it really well, drown it in an over night soak in gear oil and see where that gets you. For me, I would be perfectly comfortable using the $20.00 OEM replacement chain for my monkey every 4000 miles, but only you can make that call.

The Grom sprocket is steel and only cost $16.00 for the rear and $5.00 for the front to replace with the same OEM parts. When I change the chain I change the sprockets for good measure although I don't think my sprockets actually needed it. I clean them up and save them and will use them again someday if the world goes to hell. But for now the cost is so minimal.
 
121 - 128 of 128 Posts
Top