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Swingarm Shaft is Stuck.

This is a discussion on Swingarm Shaft is Stuck. within the Grom Talk forums, part of the Honda Grom Forums category; From the picture it looks like there is a MX type stand that the bike is on. I'd suggest that its not holding the bike ...

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Thread: Swingarm Shaft is Stuck.

  1. #11
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    squirrel_hunter's Avatar
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    From the picture it looks like there is a MX type stand that the bike is on. I'd suggest that its not holding the bike correctly and there is pressure on the swingarm causing misalignment. The bike needs to be held securely and safely, that does not include it swinging from an A ladder and some straps.

    I'm going to presume that you're disassembling the rear end. I've done this and had problems. I had a seized adjuster and attempted to remove the rear wheel in order to clean and reassemble at which point the rear axle seized as well. To solve this I took the chain off, if you are replacing this anyway loosen the front sprocket nut/ retainer first with the chain on as that makes it easier then remove the chain at the split link. Next is the swingarm, lift the bike taking pressure off of the swing arm as this is coming out. You've got the right peg off and are halfway off with the left so that's progress but taking the shock out or at least removing the link between it and the arm will help. Its now going to be a case of realigning the arm and shaft. Take that screwdriver out first. A little lifting and gentle shaking of arm should free the screwdriver, hopefully that will also allow the pivot to be released as well. If not a little bit of manipulation with the left peg as a slide hammer might help, or applying heat to the arm or pivot point could help. Heating the bolt then throwing cold water on it will not fix the problem. That should get the arm off for you.

    Now I could be wrong but it looks like you might still have the rear brake attached. I would recommend looking at that even possibly before removing the arm. I think that's an original Grom you have there so the rear reservoir is behind the fairing and the master cylinder is on the back of the peg. There is also a pipe guide on the arm that might not want to come out easily. Take as much off from the brake system as you can as it will make the next steps easier as you need to remove the rear axle.

    I did that by having removed the arm from the bike and the brake system from the arm lifting the arm on a couple of blocks of wood persuading the axle to move using a course hammer and a drift. And by drift I don't mean a screwdriver. A drift is something similar in diameter to the axle, but be aware pounding on the axle can mushroom the head. Now there is of course a risk that this has already happened to either the axle or the shaft so that something to be mindful of. New shafts and bearings will be required if that has happened.

    With the axle out the wheel is free and everything is dissembled. Budget for new bearings, bushes, axle, and pivot. I did, plus I added a new arm, different wheels, shock, pegs, and barking system parts.

  2. #12
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    David's Avatar
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    For anything you'll do on the bike in the future, do yourself and your bike a favour, download the service manual and READ IT!
    This entire procedure for example is explained step by step, it even has pictures.
    It will tell you if you need any special tools, what needs to be greased, oiled, replaced or checked, torque values, which way things need to be disassembled or assembled, etc...
    It is the best and most complete ressource if you need to work on the bike.

    And like MNNTHBX suggested keep it clean. Try to work in a clean environment. Clean the bike or parts before disassembly. Keep the parts stored cleanly and organised.
    Might seem like extra work but it will save you time and money (yes, really!) on the longer run. Plus it's just a much more pleasant way to work.
    Ending up with a greasy pile of parts on a dirty floor is very very very wrong!

    And last thing, tools. Get the right tools, it will make everything much easier and you won't damage anything. It will cost some money but again you'll save time AND money on the longer run. If you need impact guns and hammers you're probably doing something wrong. Seeing you want to take the bike appart I'd at least invest in a torque wrench.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by squirrel_hunter View Post
    From the picture it looks like there is a MX type stand that the bike is on. I'd suggest that its not holding the bike correctly and there is pressure on the swingarm causing misalignment. The bike needs to be held securely and safely, that does not include it swinging from an A ladder and some straps.

    I'm going to presume that you're disassembling the rear end. I've done this and had problems. I had a seized adjuster and attempted to remove the rear wheel in order to clean and reassemble at which point the rear axle seized as well. To solve this I took the chain off, if you are replacing this anyway loosen the front sprocket nut/ retainer first with the chain on as that makes it easier then remove the chain at the split link. Next is the swingarm, lift the bike taking pressure off of the swing arm as this is coming out. You've got the right peg off and are halfway off with the left so that's progress but taking the shock out or at least removing the link between it and the arm will help. Its now going to be a case of realigning the arm and shaft. Take that screwdriver out first. A little lifting and gentle shaking of arm should free the screwdriver, hopefully that will also allow the pivot to be released as well. If not a little bit of manipulation with the left peg as a slide hammer might help, or applying heat to the arm or pivot point could help. Heating the bolt then throwing cold water on it will not fix the problem. That should get the arm off for you.

    Now I could be wrong but it looks like you might still have the rear brake attached. I would recommend looking at that even possibly before removing the arm. I think that's an original Grom you have there so the rear reservoir is behind the fairing and the master cylinder is on the back of the peg. There is also a pipe guide on the arm that might not want to come out easily. Take as much off from the brake system as you can as it will make the next steps easier as you need to remove the rear axle.

    I did that by having removed the arm from the bike and the brake system from the arm lifting the arm on a couple of blocks of wood persuading the axle to move using a course hammer and a drift. And by drift I don't mean a screwdriver. A drift is something similar in diameter to the axle, but be aware pounding on the axle can mushroom the head. Now there is of course a risk that this has already happened to either the axle or the shaft so that something to be mindful of. New shafts and bearings will be required if that has happened.

    With the axle out the wheel is free and everything is dissembled. Budget for new bearings, bushes, axle, and pivot. I did, plus I added a new arm, different wheels, shock, pegs, and barking system parts.
    Yeah I took off the wheel, the chain, and all that. The brake system is still on. I did remove the MX stand, and put it on the ladder haha

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  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by David View Post
    For anything you'll do on the bike in the future, do yourself and your bike a favour, download the service manual and READ IT!
    This entire procedure for example is explained step by step, it even has pictures.
    It will tell you if you need any special tools, what needs to be greased, oiled, replaced or checked, torque values, which way things need to be disassembled or assembled, etc...
    It is the best and most complete ressource if you need to work on the bike.

    And like MNNTHBX suggested keep it clean. Try to work in a clean environment. Clean the bike or parts before disassembly. Keep the parts stored cleanly and organised.
    Might seem like extra work but it will save you time and money (yes, really!) on the longer run. Plus it's just a much more pleasant way to work.
    Ending up with a greasy pile of parts on a dirty floor is very very very wrong!

    And last thing, tools. Get the right tools, it will make everything much easier and you won't damage anything. It will cost some money but again you'll save time AND money on the longer run. If you need impact guns and hammers you're probably doing something wrong. Seeing you want to take the bike appart I'd at least invest in a torque wrench.
    I have a torque wrench too. I ended up using those things because the shaft just won't budge.

  6. #15
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    Swingarm Shaft is Stuck.-59548869921__795a2705-3fbc-45a4-aa17-3033e48b1f20.jpgSwingarm Shaft is Stuck.-img_7757.jpgSwingarm Shaft is Stuck.-img_7758.jpgSwingarm Shaft is Stuck.-img_7760.jpg

  7. #16
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    I took off the wheel and chain too, nothing... it won't move at all

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    Quote Originally Posted by nd4spdbh View Post
    you need to get that screwdriver out of there first. sounds like its wedged between the swingarm bolt and the frame stopping all forward progress.
    Yeah I think that's why. How would I get it off? It's a philips head. The handle is plastic so I'd hate to have it snap off the metal (I don't care about the screwdriver, it'll be a pain to get just the rod off)

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    Quote Originally Posted by MNNTHBX View Post
    Why is the chain still on the bike? It the rear wheel on as well? If so, you're adding pressure to the pivot that's working against you. Get all of that stuff gone, remove the screwdriver, and use the rearset as a slap hammer, while the swingarm is held in alignment. This is all super basic and fundamental mechanical stuff. Avoid the "get a bigger hammer" mindset. Moving forward, I'd put more emphasis on cleaning and maintenance. Nasty parts generally come apart nasty.
    Did all of that... still won't budge haha

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    You probably need two or three people to move parts around while trying to pull out the screwdriver. I would have one person move the swing arm up and down while someone else holds the bike (keep from swinging), and another person to pull on the screwdriver. You might need to vice grip the screwdriver to have leverage on it. At this point, a "bigger hammer" might be needed to get the screwdriver out.

  11. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by squirrel_hunter View Post

    I'm going to presume that you're disassembling the rear end. I've done this and had problems. I had a seized adjuster and attempted to remove the rear wheel in order to clean and reassemble at which point the rear axle seized as well. To solve this I took the chain off, if you are replacing this anyway loosen the front sprocket nut/ retainer first with the chain on as that makes it easier then remove the chain at the split link. Next is the swingarm, lift the bike taking pressure off of the swing arm as this is coming out. You've got the right peg off and are halfway off with the left so that's progress but taking the shock out or at least removing the link between it and the arm will help. Its now going to be a case of realigning the arm and shaft. Take that screwdriver out first. A little lifting and gentle shaking of arm should free the screwdriver, hopefully that will also allow the pivot to be released as well. If not a little bit of manipulation with the left peg as a slide hammer might help, or applying heat to the arm or pivot point could help. Heating the bolt then throwing cold water on it will not fix the problem. That should get the arm off for you.
    I'm fine with ordering a new shaft and all that. I took off the chain, removed the shock from the swingarm, and even removed the rear wheel. It is now on the ladder-strap "stand". I don't have any other stands lol. I lifted the swingarm, pushing it up and down, but still nothing. I did more than lifting and shaking gently lol, I tried moving it with full force. Applying heat to the axle?

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