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Brand New 2019 Grom overfilled oil

This is a discussion on Brand New 2019 Grom overfilled oil within the Grom Talk forums, part of the Honda Grom Forums category; Hello everybody, I have a question. I just bought a brand new 2019 Honda Grom a couple of weeks ago. I have about 125 miles ...

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    Brand New 2019 Grom overfilled oil

    Hello everybody, I have a question. I just bought a brand new 2019 Honda Grom a couple of weeks ago. I have about 125 miles on the bike now and I recently checked the oil to realize it is slightly overfilled. I followed the directions in the manual so I know i checked it right. I am wondering if this is how it comes from the factory on purpose for break in purposes or do I need to correct this? Also has damage been done to the bike from this? Thanks

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    How far above full is it? I know you said you followed the manual, but to clarify, you followed this procedure:
    Start the engine and let it idle for 3 – 5 minutes.
    Stop the engine and wait 2 – 3 minutes.
    On a flat, level surface, hold the motorcycle in an upright position.
    Remove the oil filler cap/dipstick and wipe oil from
    the dipstick with a clean cloth.
    Insert the oil filler cap/dipstick without screwing it in,
    remove it and check the oil level.
    If it is only slight, it's not going to cause any problems; if it is substantially overfilled, it would be sucking oil out of the PCV and into the airbox, if that were the case, oil would probably drip from the drain of the airbox.

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    There is no reason to be overfull for break-in. If it's only a small amount overfull, but you want it perfect, just extract the excess with a small hose and syringe like this one
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00J26U3R8/.
    The other potential problem it could create is to increase the pressure on the crank seal, which could cause a premature failure, unlikely though. If there was enough excess to cause it to accumulate in the airbox drain, or drip from the drain, you should take it back to the dealer who prepped it and talk to them about it, I wouldn't expect them to be willing to admit any problem or do anything about it, though.
    50-50 likes this.

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    You mean the countershaft seal?

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    Solution: Drain the oil, and pour 1 full quart back into the bike. Done.

    It is generally advisable to change the oil frequently during engine break-in anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by noob View Post
    You mean the countershaft seal?
    I could be completely wrong, but I was thinking the countershaft seal would be pretty unlikely to be affected, as the pressure created by the piston and rod displacing excess oil at the bottom of each stroke would be dissipated as the pressure travelled through the transmission to the back of the case, and the gasses forced out of the PCV would prevent the pressure at the countershaft seal from getting very high. but the excess oil displaced by the piston and rod when extremely overfull could press out on the crankshaft seal that separates the inside of the crankcase and the stator. This is the closest seal to where the high pressure is generated, making it the most likely to fail in my mind. I consider this to be extremely unlikely, but possible.
    In hindsight the OP didn't ask for all hypothetical possibilities, he asked if damage has been done, to which the answer is "probably not." Paultergeist is right, drain the oil, refill with 0.9 liters (0.96qt), done.
    Last edited by grommuter; 07-11-2019 at 02:56 AM. Reason: clarify

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    I'm not convinced that it's overfilled. Post up a photo of the oil level on the dipstick. If the dealer screwed up something like a simple oil fill/top-off I wouldn't trust them for anything and I'd report them to Honda.

    Don't do anything until you're 100% certain it's overfilled.

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    I don't think there's really a seal there. But I guess there would be more oil than normal getting through the bearing if it's overfilled.

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    Quote Originally Posted by noob View Post
    I don't think there's really a seal there. But I guess there would be more oil than normal getting through the bearing if it's overfilled.
    I haven't had a Grom motor that far apart to see it with my own eyes, but it should be part number 13 in this diagram.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Brand New 2019 Grom overfilled oil-gromoilsealfront.jpgBrand New 2019 Grom overfilled oil-gromcrankshaftoilsealback.jpg
    Doesn't matter too much because I'm sure OP's bike is fine, and OP seems to have disappeared anyway. Even if the level were filled until it was dripping out of the fill hole, it probably still wouldn't be high enough to affect any of the seals. This type of thing would be more of a concern in a car engine where you're filling from the valve cover, in which case an overfill can be bad enough to cause a hydrolock. Such a thing is common on 2005-present Corvettes, where wet sump models take ~5 quarts, but the same engine equipped with the optional dry-sump system take about 10 quarts.
    Last edited by grommuter; 07-12-2019 at 02:59 PM.

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    That's the shift shaft seal

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    Quote Originally Posted by noob View Post
    That's the shift shaft seal
    Oh my bad, didn't realize the crank was set up without a seal behind the bearing.
    Last edited by grommuter; 07-12-2019 at 11:28 PM.

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