Honda Grom Forum

Clutch Engagement Point

Thread: Clutch Engagement Point

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  1. KitKat's Avatar

    KitKat said:

    Clutch Engagement Point

    My new Monkey's clutch engages at about 90%.
    This feels much different than the other bikes I've owned.
    I prefer to have the engagement point at about 70% from the grip so as to have room to feather it.
    Is this an adjustment I can do on my own or should I bring it in to the dealer?
     
  2. mikochu said:
    You can adjust it at the clutch lever perch and clutch cover.
    mikochu

    2018 Honda Grom (Matte Gray)
    Engine: DHM 186 | 2x ECU: DHM 186 & Stock+PV3 Dank Tuned | Koso DB-03R w/ RaceDash | UEGO | MTake | DHM Header+Cheap Slip-on | Kitaco 60% Springs+Stock Plate | Superlite 16/32
    Suspension:
    RacingBros Front (7.5N/mm) / Rear (100N/mm)
    Chassis: Chimera Race Bolt | Speed Spacers | Womet-Tech Sliders | NDC Adjusters | TST Fender Eliminator | ProTaper SE Honda Mini | Neverlandback Mirrors | Corbin Saddle | Driven TT Rearsets
     
  3. stellio78 said:
    Clutch lever freeplay adjusted procedure from the manual attached
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails
    2019 Monkey in Red with ABS / 14T Front Sprocket - Install pending / Hotlap Trail Exhaust / Takegawa Tachometer / DIY Fender Eliminator / Kitaco Clutch Lifter & Springs - Install pending / OEM Oil Spinner to lighten - Waiting on delivery / Takegawa Magnetic Drain Bolt - Install pending / DIY Gear Shifter Linkage
     
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  5. Wibbly said:
    you can move where the lever sits, but you cannot make the friction zone any longer without changing the perch.


    the reason the clutch engagement point is so sudden is due to the pivot distance at the perch, and the length of the lever arm at the clutch actuator. if you do not adjust either of these pivot distances, the friction zone will always stay the same.

    it sounds to me that you want better modulation. see if there is such thing as an "easy pull" clutch perch for this bike. if there is it will lengthen the friction zone and allow you to modulate better.
     
  6. KitKat's Avatar

    KitKat said:
    Stellio78, thanks for that manual page.

    Wibbly, you are right that I want to lengthen the friction zone and have it engage sooner.
    Are you saying that it isn't possible to adjust the pivot distance without replacing the perch?
     
  7. stellio78 said:
    I felt the same as KitKat when I rode the bike home from purchasing, when I checked the freeplay it was right on 10mm and after adjusting it closer to 20mm I was satisfied with the result. So might as well give that a try.
    2019 Monkey in Red with ABS / 14T Front Sprocket - Install pending / Hotlap Trail Exhaust / Takegawa Tachometer / DIY Fender Eliminator / Kitaco Clutch Lifter & Springs - Install pending / OEM Oil Spinner to lighten - Waiting on delivery / Takegawa Magnetic Drain Bolt - Install pending / DIY Gear Shifter Linkage
     
  8. 50-50 said:
    Quote Originally Posted by Wibbly View Post
    you can move where the lever sits, but you cannot make the friction zone any longer without changing the perch.

    the reason the clutch engagement point is so sudden is due to the pivot distance at the perch, and the length of the lever arm at the clutch actuator. if you do not adjust either of these pivot distances, the friction zone will always stay the same.

    it sounds to me that you want better modulation. see if there is such thing as an "easy pull" clutch perch for this bike. if there is it will lengthen the friction zone and allow you to modulate better.
    Would changing the lever on the side cover have an effect on the friction zone or would that just change leverage?

    This is a good topic because I've had the same question about my Grom. My Grom friction zone seemed to get worse after my first oil change. Still using Dino oil.

    Can anybody recommend specific levers that will lengthen the friction zone?
     
  9. Wibbly said:
    Quote Originally Posted by KitKat View Post
    Stellio78, thanks for that manual page.

    Wibbly, you are right that I want to lengthen the friction zone and have it engage sooner.
    Are you saying that it isn't possible to adjust the pivot distance without replacing the perch?
    yes that's what i'm saying.


    the only adjustment you have is the cable slack. this will do absolutely nothing for HOW the clutch engages, it will only affect where the lever eventually picks up the slack. it's not actually meant for adjusting the position of the lever, it's meant for adjusting cable slack. think of it as a dead band adjustment.



    if you want more time in the friction zone you need to shorten the distance between the clutch cable anchor on the lever, and the pivot on the lever. doing this lengthens required lever travel to disengage the clutch, while simultaneously making the pull easier.


    the reason that the grom has such a short pull to disengage is because it has teeny tiny clutch springs. if you give the rider too much advantage at the lever you lose all your feel. the reason your other bikes had longer travels in the friction zone is that they had heavy clutch springs so the rider needed more mechanical advantage.


    an "easy pull" clutch perch for the grom would give you more modulation in the friction zone, but i do suggest you just ride it for a while, you'll get used to it.
     
  10. KitKat's Avatar

    KitKat said:
    Wibbly,
    Thanks for such a thoughtful and thorough explanation.
    I'll probably keep riding it as is and see if my muscle memory adapts before I change anything.

    Can I run my rear brake concern by you?
    My front brake is excellent but my rear brake is hardly noticeable.
    I tried to lock it up and skid, but it just doesn't have any bite. It needs a LOT of pressure to be felt.
    It seems that with a rear disk, it should have some stopping power.
    Is this an adjustment? Or is it the nature of the Monkey?
     
  11. Wibbly said:
    is the pedal spongy? is it brand new?

    brakes don't work super well until the pads have deposited a layer of their own material on the rotor. if your rotors are still new this may take a little while.

    if the pedal is spongy you may want to bleed it. if not then i doubt it's a hydraulic issue.


    did you detail the bike with any sort of waxy cleaner?